Storytelling


We organize our thoughts and the world into stories so we can try and make sense of it all.

We are story tellers.

We take the hard numbers from a poll and meld it with a candidate’s life experience to weave a story that is understandable, moving, and matters to voters.

Some of the first words we learn as kids are, “Once Upon a Time.”  Our firm takes the story from there.

Here are a few of the hundreds of spots we’ve created that tell a story with a beginning a middle and an end.

The John Lewis Story

John Lewis is the client we proudly donate our time to. We wrote and produced his 50th and 60th birthday films (above) as a tribute to this hero.

When someone walks into Congressman’s office they are often shown this film prior to meeting with the Congressman.

 

It is a story from steam engines to search engines.

In Arkansas the legislature made it more expensive for rural and poor school districts to have access to high speed Internet.

Our spot for Faster Arkansas (above) tells a story of the state coming of age with electricity and rail.  It explains why the Internet is the next great connection to the future.

 

We helped Dreama, an Airbnb host, tell her story.

“New Orleans Becomes New Model for Airbnb to Work With Cities,” New York Times, December 7th

In all campaigns, great storytelling is a way to connect voters to your issue, candidate, or corporation.

For Airbnb we needed to give viewers a different way to think about the company through the eyes – and stories – of local Airbnb hosts. In this spot Dreama, a New Orleans Airbnb Host, tells her story about what home sharing means to her and her family.  In the spot Dreama powerfully says, “In January I lost my job. Airbnb was actually the thing that kept me afloat  until being reemployed. It saved my house and kept me from moving my children.”

Watch Dreama tell her story in the video above.

 

We told the story of a city.

Tulsans were gaining a complex with Oklahoma City getting a basketball team and the limelight. So we created this homage to Tulsa for Mayor Kathy Taylor.

This spot is still acclaimed in the city.